Spend the Weekend with Aprile Millo in Toronto: Opera Spectacular!

Don’t miss this exciting event!  Legendary diva with the golden voice hits Toronto!

Come spend two nights with Aprile Millo as she presents Canadian talent and sings a long-anticipated recital in the heart of Toronto!

Thursday, November 13, 2014:  Opera Spectacular

Saturday, November 15:  Aprile Millo in Recital

 

Millo Recital 2014 Toronto

 

The legendary soprano returns to Toronto for a special weekend of music. The New York Post’s James Jorden wrote “The soprano, considered the foremost stylist of Italian romantic vocal music, always draws an audience of hard core cognoscenti, who are practically an opera in themselves”. Aware of the traditions in opera and keenly determined to see them continue on November 13, 2014 Miss Millo is presenting the promise of tomorrow in Opera Spectacular! where she is featuring a fabulous young soprano in Mary-Lou Vetere and her Vetere Studio filled with amazing Canadian voices. Then on Nov 15th, with renowned piano virtuoso, Linda Ippolito, she gives a recital of arias, art songs of Italy, lieder and Irish and American songs. Special guest artists will be joining her, Argentinian baritone, Gustavo Ahualli, and Mary-Lou Vetere showcasing another of her many talents on accordion as well, and magical harpist, Merynda Adams. Both nights will be like nothing you have ever seen.

Click here to purchase tickets to Aprile Millo Recital

 

Opera Spectacular!  Final Draft

Iconic soprano, Aprile Millo understands what it means to be a part of the great tradition of opera. Her mentors in her legendary career number some of the greatest who ever sang, Renata Tebaldi, Zinka Milanov, Magda Olivero, Elisabeth Schwarzkopf, Licia Albanese and Richard Bonygne and Randolph Mickelson and gloriously singing with Luciano Pavarotti, Placido Domingo, and Carlo Bergonzi and Canada’s great tenors, Ben Heppner, Richard Margison and the great Ermano Mauro, to name a few. Keenly aware of the need to continue the Bel Canto traditions, Mme. Millo met and mentored a talented young Canadian Italian soprano, (with a PHD yet!), in Mary-Lou Vetere and began working with her and her amazing group of young singers in The Vetere Studio. Opera Spectacular! is a glamourous evening of arias and scenes featuring some of those fabulous voices! Mme. Millo wanted to share her joy with the great nation of Canada her immense joy at finding so many wonderful artists in love with OPERA and eager to learn and promote culture and the arts. Fresh from their sold-out cheering performances in Niagara Falls, ON. this recital is unlike anything you have ever seen. Who said Opera is boring? Passion, romance, intrigue and grandeur wrapped up in a melodic little package all for the price of admission. It takes a village to raise a child, but it takes a community to build a star. Come see Canada’s brightest hopes for the future and be a part of it all!!! Channel your inner Pavarotti and come join in, you will never be the same!

 

Click here to purchase tickets to Opera Spectacular

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Metropolitan 2014/2015 Season Opener Just a Couple of Hours Away!

Met Auditorium

 

In a couple of hours, the Metropolitan Opera will open its doors to the 2014/2015 season.  Tonight, the incomparable Maestro James Levine conducts Mozart’s masterpiece, “Le Nozze di Figaro.” You can listen live on Met Opera Radio or on the Met Opera Website by clicking here.

 

LISTEN LIVE!!!

Click here to Listen Live!!!

Cast for Nozze Di Figaro:

Countess Almaviva: Amanda Majeski
Susanna: Marlis Petersen
Cherubino: Isabel Leonard
Count Almaviva: Peter Mattei
Figaro: Ildar Abdrazakov

Ildar Abrazakov

Ildar Abdrazakov as Figaro

Production Team
Production: Richard Eyre
Set & Costume Designer: Rob Howell
Lighting Designer: Paule Constable
Choreographer: Sara Erde

Isabel Leonard

Isabel Leonard as Cherubino

Join OPERACHAT LIVE during the opera!

Join OPERACHAT LIVE!!!

Speaking out for Tradition

Richard Tucker Day August 28, 2014

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Tomorrow, New York City celebrates and pays tribute to the great American tenor, Richard Tucker. Amidst all of the chaos surrounding opera in New York City in recent weeks, it is seemingly appropriate to publicize a true celebration of artistry and the genre as it ought to be considered.

Many of you have asked why I’ve not commented or posted about the ongoings at the Met and the closing of a few European houses and the truth is that 1. I refuse to join this fabricated bandwagon that opera is dying and that there are no big voices left, that tradition is dead, that opera needs to be modernized, etc…
2. Ive decided to fight back this notion by studying my own singing intently and completely focusing on tradition, perfecting my technique, and following  the influence of those great singers who came before me in hope of reversing the notion that bel canto is dead.
3. Ive centered on my studio of 35 wonderful young talents, all big voices focused on line, phrasing, text, delivery, content and complete avoidance of the plethora of uncontrolled vibrato that seems to inhabit the stage today. For those interested in hearing our traditional army of singers, stay tuned for our upcoming presentation in Toronto, Ontario in the late fall. Im so thrilled for these amazing singers and more than thrilled to present them as guardians of tradition and this art.

Finally, I feel that the times are changing. We need to get back to the opera house, back in the seats to hear LIVE singing and singers need to give audiences a reason better than looking beautiful to fill those seats. Audiences havent gone anywhere but the greats have…so lets really give em something to talk about. VOCE VOCE VOCE!!

I will have more to say in upcoming weeks and some performance announcements too but I cannot close without paying remembrance to the great Licia Albanese who passed away earlier this month. She was a beacon of tradition and truth, a guiding artist and soprano of the highest esteem. May her voice and memory remain fervent in our hearts always. Riposa in pace grande Licia!

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Published in: on August 27, 2014 at 5:41 pm  Comments (3)  
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As 2013 Draws to a Close: Reflections on Opera

2014

2013 brought world-wide celebrations for rival composers, Richard Wagner and Giuseppe Verdi.  Whilst they both respected each other deep down (if not secretly admired each other), so many words of exclusion were uttered between them during their tenure as the greatest living opera composers of the 19th Century. One did not seemingly have time for the music of the other and we might go as far as saying that the music of one did not exist for the other; but, exist it did.  In fact, Verdi may never have been inspired to compose Otello or Falstaff without Wagner’s presence and his threat to Italian operatic supremacy.  Nonetheless, without either of these composers we may not have been blessed with what remain the most important and valuable operatic compositions in history.

Wagner 200th

 

verdi-giovane

Wagner’s epic and gargantuan Der Ring Des Nibelungen continues to be a monumental presentation in opera houses like Bayreuth and the Metropolitan Opera and directors are attempting, still,  to create new ideas for this magnitudinous work.  Verdi, on the other hand, bore operas that are staples of melody, intricate plots, drama, and memorable arias to the point that there isn’t an opera house on earth that doesn’t present a Verdi opera in every season.  What would Italian opera be without the magnificence of Il Trovatore, Don Carlo, Traviata, or Otello?  The world over, celebrations have graced this operatic year, giving honour and praise to these two giants.  These are interesting historical times to live in, to say the least.

la-scala

Amidst celebrations, there has also been fear over the economic and artistic state in Italy, and threats to close La Scala, the leading opera house in the country.  That Italians might even ponder this idea seems like a self-imploding mistake, but I hold fast to the fact that Italians are very territorial and very patriotic.  They will not let the house close or be threatened because opera is, contrary to some who think it’s soccer, the national pastime of Italians.  It is their greatest universal export and the birthplace of opera.  Let’s keep Italy and all countries in our thoughts as the New Year chimes in, in hope for continued prosperity and the protection of the art we love.

For some, 2013 has brought strife, illness, losses, anxiety, death, and suffering.  So many people I’ve spoken to have had one of the worst years possible. Nearing the end of this year, I lost my beloved grandfather Raffaele Greco, who was an artisan, and Italian trained tailor and clothing designer who inspired my life in many ways. The pain of loss never ceases but it eases by lingering in memories.  Every time I try on a new gown or costume, I can’t help think of him and his precise and pristine manner with clothing to the point that I, myself, have become picky about tailoring. Whatever the reasons, perhaps it’s the association with the number 13, or just a turning point in the scheme of life this year, we will never know understand reasons for having an extraordinarily bad year. On a positive turn, I think the best thing to do in this case is to take the bad with the good, even if it comes in small doses.  It is important to be thankful and know that a bleak year usually means that the next one won’t be so bleak.  Hopefully, it will be filled with joy, happiness, good health, success, birth, and prosperity.  We can only take what we’ve learned and move forward so here’s to ending 2013 and starting 2014 on a positive and prosperous note. I, for one, intend 2014 to be a fabulous year.  I hope you do, too!

Michael-Fabiano-Final-1

Rising Tenor, Michael Fabiano

Since, I keep abreast of all things Metropolitan Opera, I want to encourage you to tune into the New Year’s Eve broadcast on Met Opera Radio or Live on the Met Website, which is the ever fun and fashionable Die Fledermaus.  In it, the fabulous rising tenor, Michael Fabiano, makes his debut as Alfred and will show you the fun and comical side of his usually handsome, brooding, and serious characterizations.  Although Michael is versatile and will wow you in this role, we’re waiting to see him at the Met in his exquisite interpretation of Rodolfo and other romantic roles.  Congratulations to him and all singers who have made debuts and recordings this year, specifically a new recording by the ever beautiful Ailyn Perez and her handsome husband and sunny-voiced tenor, Stephen Costello.  You will want to get this one while it’s hot!  Also, kudos to mezzo-soprano’s Jamie Barton on her Met Debut as Adalgisa and her winning the Cardiff Singer of the World competition, and to Isabel Leonard who was the recipient of the Richard Tucker Award. These young singers are the lifeblood of opera today and I wish them every bit of success possible.  Keep your eye on them in 2014 and you won’t be disappointed!

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Stephen Costello and Ailyn Perez

Jamie Barton

Cardiff Singer of the World:  mezzo-soprano Jamie Barton

Isabel Leonard

Richard Tucker Award Winner:  mezzo-soprano Isabel Leonard

To all opera lovers:  it seems like we belong to a special club that no one else understands.  We actually do and how blessed are we to understand, know, and adore this art that has caused controversy, excitement, audience explosions, scandal, thrills, and absolute beauty since its inception?  To talk about it and discuss it is to keep its blood flowing, to keep it thriving.  I will never stop talking about opera or wanting to share its magnificent message.  There is nothing like it!  We can all do our part to keep it alive in our own communities, to share it with people who haven’t yet been bitten by the bug, and to continue to support LIVE performance.  Here’s to 2014 and to opera, the greatest art in the world, and the closest thing to Heaven that we’ll ever know.  May 2014 be blessed  for you and yours.  Cheers!

Golden Sky Happy New Year 2014 HD Wallpapers

What’s on Met Opera Radio This Week: October 28-Nov 3

metropolitan-opera-house2

Monday, October 28, 2013

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6:00 AM ET 9:00 AM ET

12:00 PM ET 7:25 PM ET 12:00 AM ET

Gluck: Alceste
3/8/1941-Panizza; Bampton, Maison, Warren

Mozart: Die Zauberflöte
1/22/1977-Conlon; Valente, Burrows, Shane, Plishka, Uppman

Wagner: Götterdämmerung
4/17/1993-Levine; Jones, Johns, Held, Plette, Salminen

Bellini: Norma (LIVE FROM THE MET) Frizza; Meade, Barton, Antonenko, Morris

Mozart: Die Entführung aus dem Serail
3/31/1984-Rudel; Malfitano, Araiza, Blegen, Creech, Korn

 

Tuesday, October 29, 2013

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6:00 AM ET

9:00 AM ET 12:00 PM ET 3:00 PM ET

7:55 PM ET 12:00 AM ET

Tchaikovsky: Eugene Onegin
2/24/2007-Gergiev; Hvorostovsky, Fleming, Vargas, Zaremba, Aleksashkin

Verdi: Aida
3/3/1962-Schick; Tucci, Dalis, Corelli, MacNeil, Tozzi

Offenbach: Les Contes d’Hoffmann
2/7/1959-Morel; Gedda, Dobbs, Elias, Amara, London, Vanni

Janácek: Kát’a Kabanová
1/9/1999-Mackerras; Malfitano, Forst, Karnéus, Straka, Baker

Puccini: Tosca (SEASON PREMIERE – LIVE FROM THE MET)
Frizza; Racette, Alagna, Gagnidze, Del Carlo

Verdi: Rigoletto
12/7/1968-Cleva; Merrill, Moffo, Bergonzi, Love, Michalski

 

 

Wednesday, October 30, 2013

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6:00 AM ET

9:00 AM ET 12:00 PM ET 3:00 PM ET 6:00 PM ET 9:00 PM ET 12:00 AM ET

Gounod: Roméo et Juliette
1/25/1986-Cambreling; Malfitano, Shicoff, Plishka, Harris, Schexnayder

Puccini: Madama Butterfly
2/26/2000-Rudel; Crider, Larin, White, Josephson

Donizetti: La Favorita
3/11/1978-López-Cobos; Verrett, Pavarotti, Milnes, Giaiotti

Massenet: Manon
12/21/1963-Schippers; Moffo, Gedda, Guarrera, Tozzi

R. Strauss: Elektra
2/27/1971-Böhm; Nilsson, Rysanek, Madeira, Stewart, Nagy

Gluck: Alceste
3/8/1941-Panizza; Bampton, Maison, Warren

Mozart: Die Zauberflöte
1/22/1977-Conlon; Valente, Burrows, Shane, Plishka, Uppman

 

 

Thursday, October 31, 2013

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6:00 AM ET 12:00 PM ET 3:00 PM ET 7:25 PM ET

12:00 AM ET

Wagner: Götterdämmerung
4/17/1993-Levine; Jones, Johns, Held, Plette, Salminen

Mozart: Die Entführung aus dem Serail
3/31/1984-Rudel; Malfitano, Araiza, Blegen, Creech, Korn

Verdi: Aida
3/3/1962-Schick; Tucci, Dalis, Corelli, MacNeil, Tozzi

Britten: A Midsummer Night’s Dream (LIVE FROM THE MET)
Conlon; Kim, Davies, M. Rose, Kaiser, DeShong, Simpson, Wall, Costello

Tchaikovsky: Eugene Onegin
2/24/2007-Gergiev; Hvorostovsky, Fleming, Vargas, Zaremba, Aleksashkin

 

Friday, November 1, 2013

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6:00 AM ET 9:00 AM ET

12:00 PM ET 3:00 PM ET 6:00 PM ET

Offenbach: Les Contes d’Hoffmann
2/7/1959-Morel; Gedda, Dobbs, Elias, Amara, London, Vanni

Janácek: Kát’a Kabanová
1/9/1999-Mackerras; Malfitano, Forst, Karnéus, Straka, Baker

R. Strauss: Elektra
2/27/1971-Böhm; Nilsson, Rysanek, Madeira, Stewart, Nagy

Verdi: Rigoletto
12/7/1968-Cleva; Merrill, Moffo, Bergonzi, Love, Michalski

Mozart: Die Zauberflöte
1/22/1977-Conlon; Valente, Burrows, Shane, Plishka, Uppman

9:00 PM ET
12:00 AM ET

 

Saturday, November 2, 2013

Gounod: Roméo et Juliette
1/25/1986-Cambreling; Malfitano, Shicoff, Plishka, Harris, Schexnayder

Puccini: Madama Butterfly
2/26/2000-Rudel; Crider, Larin, White, Josephson

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6:00 AM ET 9:00 AM ET 12:00 PM ET 3:00 PM ET

6:00 PM ET

Mozart: Die Entführung aus dem Serail
3/31/1984-Rudel; Malfitano, Araiza, Blegen, Creech, Korn

Massenet: Manon
12/21/1963-Schippers; Moffo, Gedda, Guarrera, Tozzi

Gluck: Alceste
3/8/1941-Panizza; Bampton, Maison, Warren

Tchaikovsky: Eugene Onegin
2/24/2007-Gergiev; Hvorostovsky, Fleming, Vargas, Zaremba, Aleksashkin

Wagner: Götterdämmerung
4/17/1993-Levine; Jones, Johns, Held, Plette, Salminen

12:00 AM ET Donizetti: La Favorita
3/11/1978-López-Cobos; Verrett, Pavarotti, Milnes, Giaiotti

 

Sunday, November 3, 2013

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6:00 AM ET 9:00 AM ET 12:00 PM ET

3:00 PM ET

6:00 PM ET

9:00 PM ET 12:00 AM ET

R. Strauss: Elektra
2/27/1971-Böhm; Nilsson, Rysanek, Madeira, Stewart, Nagy

Verdi: Rigoletto
12/7/1968-Cleva; Merrill, Moffo, Bergonzi, Love, Michalski

Gounod: Roméo et Juliette
1/25/1986-Cambreling; Malfitano, Shicoff, Plishka, Harris, Schexnayder

Puccini: Madama Butterfly
2/26/2000-Rudel; Crider, Larin, White, Josephson

Offenbach: Les Contes d’Hoffmann
2/7/1959-Morel; Gedda, Dobbs, Elias, Amara, London, Vanni

This Month at the Met

Verdi: Aida
3/3/1962-Schick; Tucci, Dalis, Corelli, MacNeil, Tozzi

 

Siriusxm logo

Check in Tomorrow for a fascinating EXCLUSIVE Interview Celebrating Verdi, Singing, Today’s Artistic Climate, Bel Canto, and Life.

It’s so interesting, you’ll have to read it twice!

 

Tomorrow, on THE LAST VERISTA

Interview

 

Verdi 200th

Ma Ride Ben Chi Ride la Risata Final: Verdi and the Fusion of Genres

         Tutto nel mondo é burla. 
          L’uom é nato burlone, 
          La fede in cor gli ciurla, 
          Gli ciurla la ragione. 
          Tutti gabbati! Irride 
          L’un l’altro ogni mortal. 
          Ma ride ben chi ride 
          La risata final.

Final text from the Libretto of “Falstaff”

FalstaffFalstaff:  to end with a comedy

When I first started studying Verdi’s operas, I for some strange reason steered away from Falstaff.  When you’re a teenager, you think you know what you’re doing, so I decided it would be a good idea to read through the synopsis of the operas and see which one I wanted to listen to next, without any sort of regard for when those works were written and which period they belonged to.  For whatever reason, the idea of Falstaff did not interest me, which is ironic since it is one of the operas I most devoted my time two during my PhD studies. At the time, learning the repertoire meant immersing myself in the larger-than-life stories, the dramatic largess of the characters, and the fabulously delicious unhappy endings that many of the operas culminated in.  Again…a teenager.  The idea of listening to a comedy by Verdi…not so interesting….or so I thought.

To end with a comedy:

After the multitude of operas Verdi wrote that were based on everything from “la patria” to “figlia mia,” the very notion that he ended with a comedy is not only a significant statement, but a cause for historians to look at Falstaff more closely.  Furthermore, that he collaborated on the opera with his one-time rival, Arrigo Boito is incredibly telling.  Earlier in their massive correspondence, Verdi had written “There is no place in Italian Music for Germanic forms.” By this he meant the more symphonic idioms that Boito had been promoting in and around Milano, such as the fugue.  Boito had used a Fuga Infernale in Mefistofele but later abandoned the idea in order to make his opera more conventional and acceptable.  That Verdi ended his illustrious career with a Fugue is fascinating to say the least.

What is more, the final text, as written above, suggests that in composing Falstaff, Verdi got the last laugh.  What does this mean, exactly?  The way I see it, after assessing much of the musico-political situation in Milano, Verdi was powerful, but more powerful than him was Giulio Ricordi and the Ricordi Enterprise, who had often made specific and well-known commentary to composers like Giacomo Puccini to “write in the Italian way,” or else–so to speak.  Both primary and secondary documents describe how very involved Ricordi was with the composition of operas in Italy after the Risorgimento and especially with those composers who were the highest regarded in his company.  It is very likely that Ricordi, in addition to the censors, had placed constraints on Verdi, and it seemed as though Verdi continued to compose traditionally until the Messa da Requiem and Aida.  His late period of works, then are more interesting musicologically than this earlier works because of the shift in compositional style to a more through-composed one, but Falstaff–a comedy that ends with a fugue, is probably the most vividly different than anything Verdi had composed before and makes one wonder what he might have composed next.

giulio_ricordi

Giulio Ricordi

The Fusion of Genres

During my studies I came across a seminal article by historian Piero Weiss entitled, “Verdi and the Fusion of Genres,” published in the Journal of the American Musicological Society (vol. 35/1) Spring 1982, pp. 138-156, that not only caught my attention but illuminated several mysterious aspects of Verdi’s compositional impetus.  Weiss describes how as early as Luisa Miller, Verdi had desired to bring comedy into his operas.  Weiss quotes a statement of Verdi’s on the subject:

Prolonged experience has confirmed me in the ideas I’ve always had concerning theatrical effect, although in my first years I had not the courage to manifest them, except in part. (For instance, I shouldn’t have risked writing Rigoletto ten years ago.) I find our opera2errs on the side of excessive monotony, so much so that today I should refuse to set such subjects as Nabucco,Foscari,etc. etc. They present dramatic moments of great interest, but no variety. They harp on only one string, a lofty one, if you like, yet always the same one. To make my meaning clearer: Tasso’s poem may possibly be better, but I much, much prefer Ariosto. For the same reason I prefer Shakespeare to all other dramatists, not excepting the Greeks. It seems to me the best subject I have set to music so far, from the point of view of effect (I don’t at all mean to allude to its literary or poetic merit), is Rigoletto.It has very powerful situations, variety, verve, pathos. (Alessandro Pascolato, ed., Re Lear e Ballo in maschera: lettere di Giuseppe Verdi ad 

Antonio Somma (Citta’di Castello, 1902), pp. 45-46).

 

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It is not new to historians that Verdi had a fascination for Shakespeare, who often infused moments of comic relief in his tragedies and vice-versa, but of course the fusion of genres was not allowed in post-Risorgimento Italy.  For Verdi, the notion of combing comedy and tragedy made the subject matter more “human,” more “realistic,” however it appears that he was not able to effect this as he wished to. Interestingly, his idol, Alessandro Manzoni was the one who promoted the separation of genres and so had Verdi veered from what was “acceptable” it would have meant going against the idiomatic practices of his idol.When Verdi wrote Macbeth, according to Weiss, he modelled it exactly on Shakespeare’s, except for one very important detail.  “

The one moment of comedy in the play, the Porter’s scene, was omitted as a matter of course, coming immediately after the knocking of the gate, it probably would have stopped the opera dead in its tracks.” (Weiss, 142).

And what of the character of Rigoletto, is he not a jester?  In essence he is, however, Rigoletto never once sings comic music.  His “La Ra La Ra’s” are not comedic.  They descend in a minor pattern, and indicate his strife more than his comic thrust.

Rigoletto

More fascinating is the notion that the separation of genres affected Verdi’s composing of King Lear.  There has been much discussion about the “discarded” opera and in lieu of Verdi’s struggles against the censors and especially with this issue, he could not possibly have gotten away with writing an opera whose main character is “a fool,” without crossing lines that he was not yet willing to cross.  One wonders what King Lear would have sounded like.

Fool

Taking these details into consideration, it is even more amazing that Verdi ended his operatic smorgasbord with a comedy.  It’s almost like someone is a vegetarian their entire life and then on their last day, they decide to eat meat.  Fascinating indeed, but then Verdi was not a typical man.  He was a man of great determination and in the end, he certainly got his last laugh.  VIVA VERDI!!!

Enjoy the complete opera “Falstaff”

VERDI WEEK on The Last Verista: “Viva Verdi: Celebrating 200 magnificent years of this “Grande Maestro”

verdi-giovane

In a time fraught with financial issues and artistic controversies, the opera world welcomes this historically relevant week in anticipation of the 200th Birthday of the great and individual composer, Giuseppe Verdi.  This week on the Last Verista, posts will be dedicated to his music, his life, his thoughts, letters, and those singers and conductors who have spent years perfecting the art of Verdian cantilena.  As opera companies and orchestras the world over prepare their celebratory concerts, Verdi’s week of celebration could not have come at a better time, considering the almost idiotic suggestions about closing opera houses like La Scala Milano.  Perhaps by wafting in the joy of Verdi’s music, those persons running said companies might recall just how poignant and historical La Scala, and opera houses in general, really are.  

verdi e boito

With his, at first, rival and then most fervent companion and colleague, Arrigo Boito

On Met Opera Radio, the entire week is devoted to Verdi operas, so if you have a subscription to Sirius/XM Radio, tune in and if you don’t, this is as good a time as any to cash in on the free 7 day trial.  How great a life was Verdi’s! For all he gave to us, the fact that his operas continue to remain staples in most operatic seasons, and for the luminous melodies and soaring orchestral idioms that sometimes seem metaphysical (of this world and yet seemingly of next) CELEBRAMO! Personally, I stand in reverence and devotion to this great man who, in my line of work, gives me something beautiful every day of my life.  “Gioir!!” “Gioir!!”  “Viva Verdi!”

Verdi’s Don Carlo to Open at La Scala on October 12

teatro-alla-scala

Conductors: Fabio Luisi, Piergiorgio Morandi

Staging and sets: Stéphane Braunschweig

Costumes: Thibaut Van Craenenbroeck

Lights: Marion Hewlett

PapeRene Pape as Filippo

Kocan

Stefan Kocan alternates as Fillippo and Il Grande Inquisitore

Filippo II, re di Spagna:  René Pape (12, 16, 19, 23, 26), Stefan Kocán (29)

Don Carlo, Infante di Spagna: Fabio Sartori

Rodrigo, Marchese di Posa: Massimo Cavalletti

Il Grande Inquisitore, cieco nonagenario: Štefan Kocán (12, 16, 19, 23, 26), Rafal Siwek (29)

Un frate: Fernando Rado

Elisabetta di Valois: Martina Serafin

La Principessa d’Eboli: Ekaterina Gubanova

Tebaldo, paggio d’Elisabetta: Barbara Lavarian

Il Conte di Lerma: Carlos Cardoso

Un araldo reale: Carlo Bosi

Voce dal cielo: Roberta Salvati

Deputati fiamminghi: Ernesto Panariello, Simon Lim, Davide Pelissero, Filippo Polinelli, Federico Sacchi, Luciano Montanaro

Link to Don Carlo at the Teatro alla Scala

New Poll: What is your favourite International Opera House?

With all the talk of closing opera houses and companies, I thought it appropriate to ask this question.

Which house gives you chills just by walking in the door?

Is it because of who sang there?

Is it because of who conducted there or which opera premiered there?

Is it because of the history associated with the building?

Tell TLV which of these fabulous houses is your favourite!

The Metropolitan Opera

Met

Teatro Alla Scala (Milano)

La Scala Interior

Wiener Staatsoper

Vienna Staatsoper

Berliner Staatsoper

Berlin Staatsoper

Bayerische Staatsoper

Bayerische Staatsoper

Canadian Opera Company

coc

Royal Opera House (London)

Royal Opera House

Paris Opera (Palais Garnier)

Palais Garnier

Sydney Opera House

Sydney_Opera_House_-_Dec_2008

La Fenice (Venice)

La Fenice

Hungarian State Opera (Budapest)

Budapest-Opera-House-Final

Bolshoi Theatre (Moscow)

Bolshoi

Liceu Barcellona

Teatre-del-Liceu

Semperoper Dresden

Semperoper Dresden

Bayreuth Festspielhaus

Bayreuth-festspielhaus03

Teatro Municipal (Rio de Janiero)

teatro_municipal_do_rio_de_janeiro

Boston Opera

Boston Opera

War Memorial Opera House (San Francisco)

San Franscisco Opera

Teatro dell’Opera (Roma)

Roma

Opera Bastille

Bastille