Upcoming Broadcasts: Tonight “Carmen” Live from the MET

It’s always a great idea to sit down with a glass of wine or a good cup of coffee or tea and listen to LIVE opera.  If you can’t get to the house to hear it live, this is the next best thing.  Here is what is coming up this week!

Carmen: Tuesday September 30, 2014

7:30pm

with

Conductor: Pablo Heras-Casado
Micaëla: Anita Hartig
Carmen: Anita Rachvelishvili
Don José: Aleksandrs Antonenko
Escamillo: Massimo Cavalletti

Click here to Listen Live!

Also available on Met Opera Radio via Sirius/XM Radio

To Chat Live click here to enter OPERACHAT LIVE!

 

Anita Hartig

Soprano, Anita Hartig is Micaela

Macbeth: Friday, October 3, 2014

7:30pm

with

Conductor: Fabio Luisi
Lady Macbeth: Anna Netrebko
Macduff: Joseph Calleja
Macbeth: Željko Lucic
Banquo: René Pape

 

Click here to Listen Live on Sirius XM Radio (via subscription)

 

Anna Netrebko Macbeth Metropolitan Opera

Soprano Anna Netrebko is Lady Macbeth

Claudio Abbado, Rusalka, and more on the Weight/Voice issue

Abbado

Maestro Claudio Abbado (1933-2014)

The most significant event in recent days was the unfortunate passing of Maestro Claudio Abbado at 80 years of age, after a lengthy illness.  Known for his devotion to Italian Opera, opera fans and music fans are devastated over the loss of this enigmatic, giving, and very special man.  The following is his full obituary from The Guardian:

Claudio Abbado, who has died aged 80, was not only among the greatest of conductors; in his last decade, after suffering from very severe illness, he raised a superband of players all gathered together for his sake, the Lucerne Festival Orchestra, to heights that many listeners have never experienced in other orchestral concerts. A recording producer defined his special gift as a sense of “absolute pulse” – more precisely, an unerring sense of the right and natural tempo relations in a piece that could give shape and meaning even to the most seemingly amorphous of works, and within that a supple life to the individual musical phrases that no contemporary has equalled. He also rejected what he called the “ghettoisation” of music and refused to make a special case for “modern” music as a thing apart: he was as ardent a champion of many living composers as of Brahms or Debussy.
 
Reserved and economical of gesture in rehearsal, frequently inspirational in performance, he regarded conversation about his profession as a poor means of communicating about the act of music-making. He was surely right; his achievements at the head of the Vienna and Berlin Philharmonic orchestras, which elect their chief conductors, and then of the Lucerne ensemble speak for themselves.

 
He was born into a musical family in Milan. His mother, Maria, gave him his first piano lessons when he was eight years old; his father, Michelangelo, was a violinist and teacher at the city’s Giuseppe Verdi Conservatory, where Claudio followed his older brother Marcello, now a distinguished pianist and composer, as a student of piano, conducting and composition. Graduating from the conservatory in 1955, he spent the next summer at the masterclasses of Siena’s Accademia Chigiana. There another promising student, Zubin Mehta, recommended him to his teacher at the Vienna Music Academy, Hans Swarowsky, whose mathematical approach Abbado was later to value for laying firm foundations and freeing him to concentrate on interpretation.
 
Abbado also benefited from the more general lessons of great masters in Vienna. In Milan, he had seen Furtwängler and Toscanini conduct; now he and Mehta joined the bass section of the Vienna Singverein exclusively to learn from the technique of Herbert von Karajan. In 1958, the year of his graduation from the academy, he travelled to Tanglewood in the US to participate in the Koussevitzky prize competition andon his own admission was astonished to come first.
 
Success, however, was still not immediate; after making his operatic debut that same year conducting Prokofiev’s Love for Three Oranges in Trieste and a first appearance at the Milan’s Piccolo Scala in a concert in 1960 to celebrate the 300th anniversary of the birth of Alessandro Scarlatti, he turned to teaching – partly to support his new wife, Giovanna Cavazzoni, and their two children, Daniele and Alessandra. As the post was to take charge of chamber music at the Parma Conservatoire, he learned invaluable lessons about listening to other musicians and lost no time in familiarising his Italian students with scores by Schoenberg, Bartók and Stravinsky.
 
Then, in 1963, he returned to America for another competition given in the name of Dimitri Mitropoulos; this time, he later declared, he conducted badly, the award of (joint) first prize was wrong and the whole experience revealed the iniquities of the competition system.
 
The real turning point came not with his subsequent appearance with the New York Philharmonic but two years later, when at Karajan’s invitation he chose to perform Mahler’s Second (Resurrection) Symphony with the Vienna Philharmonic at the Salzburg Festival.
 
The large-scale late romantic symphony was to become one of the pillars on which his reputation was established, and launched his last Mahler series in Lucerne; two others followed in the shape of a contemporary opera – Giacomo Manzoni’s Nuclear Death – and Bellini’s I Capuleti e I Montecchi, both of which he subsequently conducted at La Scala. Milan was not slow to offer him the post of principal conductor there, which he took up in 1968; the titles of music director and artistic director followed in 1972 and 1976 respectively.
 
Strengthening the backbone of the Scala orchestra with an injection of non-Italian players, he encouraged it to look beyond the confines of Italian opera to the wider symphonic repertoire and even to chamber music. Even so, he never lost sight of its essential Italianate singing quality and refused to record Verdi with any other orchestra – a conviction to which his 1977 recording of Simon Boccanegra is perhaps the finest testament. At the same time, other opera houses were to benefit from his supremely flexible Verdi conducting; he made his debut at London’s Royal Opera in 1968 with Don Carlos.
 
Establishment infighting took its toll on the conscientious and introspective Abbado; he resigned several times in the 1970s when La Scala politics threatened to overwhelm him. A shorter course in opera-house politics came in 1991 when he gave up his two-year post as music director of the notoriously difficult Vienna State Opera on grounds of ill-health (though he continued to serve as artistic consultant). Yet his achievements here, too, were outstanding – above all new productions of Mussorgsky’s Khovansh- china and Berg’s Wozzeck, both recorded for posterity – and his relationship with the Vienna Philharmonic, which also serves as the opera’s orchestra, had been well established since 1971.
 
Three collaborations with younger ensembles brought out the best in Abbado, as they were to do in Lucerne when he conducted the Simón Bolívar Youth Orchestra of Venezuela. He united the Chamber Orchestra of Europe and an outstanding roster of international singers in Rossini’s effervescent but then-neglected Il Viaggio a Reims at the 1985 Pesaro festival; the resultant recording proved a bestseller and remains a desert-island set for many opera lovers. When he took over as music director of the European Community Youth Orchestra in 1977, the astonishing results they achieved together came from a training and dedication few other international conductors would be willing to offer. The orchestra’s organiser, Joy Bryer, has spoken about his concern for the individual welfare of the young players and his tireless attempts to help them in their careers after their time in the ECYO. In 1986 he established another ensemble for whom no allowances of age and inexperience ever needed to be made, the Gustav Mahler Youth Orchestra; their Mahler Fourth and Ninth Symphony performances are, happily, preserved on DVD.
 
Abbado would have been the first to place his concerts with the ECYO as equal in importance to his long-term work with three major orchestras. In 1979 he celebrated his appointment as principal conductor of the London Symphony Orchestra with a typically electrifying concert of Brian Ferneyhough, Brahms – the First Piano Concerto, with his long-term concerto partner Maurizio Pollini – and Tchaikovsky, to whose symphonies he always brought a bel canto beauty of line. His programmes in the orchestra’s Mahler, Vienna and the Twentieth Century series were both eclectic and logical; on one evening, the Adagio from the Tenth Symphony and Debussy’s Nocturnes shared an elusive tonal incandescence that will never be forgotten by those who heard it.
 
Even so, the Vienna Philharmonic remained Abbado’s ideal instrument for Mahler, and in 1990 he moved on to the greatest challenge of his careerr at that time – moulding the life of the Berlin Philharmonic after the Karajan years. On the face of it, the changes in Berlin were obvious – to extend the orchestra’s repertoire beyond the late romantic core which had been Karajan’s element. Although Abbado would voice his reservations about visiting conductors who expected to shine in the standard works for which the orchestra had become famous rather than to challenge audiences with anything new, he was in a unique position to do both. His intensive work with promising musicians continued in the Berlin Encounters concerts of the annual Berlin festival, created in conjunction with the cellist Natalia Gutman – who later, and surely uniquely for the finest of soloists, played in his Lucerne orchestra – to bring together young instrumentalists with established professionals.
 
Musical life in Berlin was not always plain sailing; Abbado was wounded, as ever, by critical campaigns against his integrity and his work with the orchestra. There was sometimes a feeling in his later performances and recordings that the old, familiar sense of challenge had gone gentle; his Mahler Eighth Symphony in Berlin, for example, proved a surprisingly soft-grained conclusion to a Mahler cycle on disc that had begun with a far greater sense of dynamism (it was the only Mahler symphony he would later fail to conduct in Lucerne, where an advertised performance was pulled and replaced by the Mozart Requiem). On the other hand, the Brahms Third Symphony that he brought to London with his orchestra in 1998 still revealed a masterly control of ebb and flow in a work which Abbado had always regarded as one of the most difficult to conduct from the technical point of view. His turning back to Beethoven at the end of a musically rich career was characteristic of the way he was able to blend a self-renewing personal vision of familiar music with a close examination of textual scholarship (in this case Jonathan Del Mar’s painstaking edition of the symphonies).
 
After radical treatment for cancer, Abbado took on a new lease of life by recreating the ideals of a Festival Orchestra in Lucerne in 2003. Not only did this usually laconic figure speak eloquently about how music had given him a burning will to live and how he felt his approach had now deepened; the players he gathered around him raised the whole notion of orchestral solidarity, at a time when the structure was coming under question, to a whole new level.
 
There were string quartets starting with the Hagen Quartet, top players from the Berlin Philharmonic and other world orchestras and a core of the youth he valued so much in the Mahler Chamber Orchestra. When I met the MCO conductor Daniel Harding at the 2005 festival, he described the big orchestral collaboration as resulting in “not so much a concert as a love-in”, treasuring its uniqueness while questioning whether such a situation could possibly last.
 
It did, through to a Mahler Ninth in 2010 which I cannot be alone in unhesitatingly naming the greatest concert that I have ever heard. There were also a concert Fidelio, and a Bruckner Fifth which the ensemble brought to London in 2011. Sadly, Abbado was too ill to conduct further concerts planned in London. I count myself lucky to have seen a collaboration between the Orchestra Mozart and the Orchestra of Accademia di Santa Cecilia in Rome, where Abbado wrought supernatural magic in Tchaikovsky’s The Tempest and was warmly embraced at the end by president Giorgio Napolitano. It came as no surprise when last August Napolitano appointed him senator for life.
 
Abbado’s breadth of interests and curiosity remained a constant: a start had been made on planting the 90,000 magnolias that he suggested for Milan in 2008; later, deeply impressed by Michael Haneke’s film The White Ribbon, he earmarked him as the ideal collaborator for a putative production of Berg’s Wozzeck.
 
The awards and honours garnered throughout the conductor’s life would be as impossible to list as the number of truly outstanding performances with orchestras and opera companies throughout the world. What remains are the films and the discs, equalling in their mastery and outshining in their breadth those of his equals, Furtwängler and Toscanini.
 
Abbado’s first marriage ended in divorce. He is survived by his second wife, Gabriella Cantalupi, and their son, Sebastiano; by Daniele and Alessandra; by Misha, his son with the violinist Viktoria Mullova; and by his brothers, Marcello and Gabriele, and his sister, Luciana.
• Claudio Abbado, conductor, born 26 June 1933; died 20 January 2014
 
 
 

Rusalka at the Met

With exciting news that Ms. Fleming is set to sing the American National Anthem at the upcoming Super Bowl, reviews for her Rusalka at the Met were mixed.  Here are a few reviews, but of course, go to the opera house and judge for yourself.  Unquestionably, Ms. Fleming has one of the  more “pretty” voices in opera but interestingly, she is having some difficulties which I think are less due to ability and more to the fact that she is singing less.  She’s frankly not old enough to be singing less but it is all about what you let people tell you…in the Golden Age of singing, singers sang until they were 70 and those techniques seemed to last just fine. I’m not sure I understand this newfound “youth age” of opera.  I’d so much rather see a seasoned performer who has been on the stage for years perform opera, rather than the “let’s find the next best thing” attitude that seems to be permeating the art form today.  It’s one thing to look for talent, but another entirely to dismiss singers whose voices work just fine because they’re (gasp) middle aged!  I mean seriously!

Zachary Woolfe’s Review (The New York Times)

Wilborn Hampton (The Huffington Post)

Anne Midgette on Fleming at the Super Bowl (The Washington Post)

Weight/Voice? What is Opera really about?

The following article appeared in the London Telegraph today and really infuriated me and will likely infuriate many opera supporters and aficionados of the authentic art.

Danielle De Niese: New generation of opera stars to combat ‘fat lady sings’ parody (Hannah Furness)

First of all, the photo accompanying this article is laughable.  Is THAT what we’re going to see at the opera?  There are a few strip clubs in my home town or a few shows in gay Paris that would offer the same view without the singing.  Geez!  If we’re supposed to be seeing this, then why on earth didn’t Renata Tebaldi, Renata Scotto, Leontyne Price, Kiri Te Kanawa (who is mentioned in the article), Tatiana Troyanos, Teresa Stratas, Claudia Muzio, Rosa Ponselle, Elizabeth Schwarzkopf, Christa Ludwig….do you want me to go on?….dress like this on-stage.  Lord knows half the world would have killed to see that!  I mean really!  Is that what we are combating ‘the fat lady sings’ with?!!

There is no question, opera is about singing, about voices, or at least it ought to be….frankly, I don’t think anyone has gone to the opera to see someone’s face but to hear their voice and to be touched by it, to be pierced by the live human instrument, to be affected by the story, to exist in a world “other” than our own for a little while before returning to the often heavy reality of our lives.  When Birgit Nilsson sang, you didn’t go to see her face or to see her parade around in her skivvies, you went and you barely breathed as that voice began its ascent into the stratosphere…what she did with sheer human power and a God-given gift was what caused the sensation.  You would attend to hear Price, whose face was glorious I might add, begin her regal floating, spinning lines of gold thread and everything stood still.  These women weren’t waifs and their intension was never to parade around in a corset!!  I think if they had been asked to in this day and age, they wouldn’t have even sung because so many things are becoming disrespectful to an art that has long existed as a vocation and an obligation, not a social party to look at pretty girls and see who can get more naked on stage (I think Catharine Malfitano wins that award for her portrayal of Strauss’ Salome, in which she stripped down to the nude during the dance of the seven veils….mind you, she was a fabulous Salome vocally so her nakedness on stage wasn’t to detract from the fact that she couldn’t sing.  It was done in a dramatic impetus).

Weight, by the way, has NOTHING to do with technique.  If you know how to sing, you can sing well heavy and you can sing well thin, or in between.  There is so much being placed on this issue today that it disgusts me, and you know what the long and short of it is:  the argument is only coming from singers (and directors, casting and otherwise) who seem obsessed with worry that the fat lady is going to come and blow them off the stage because they can sing better.  1. That is not the case because you “should” be able to sing just as well thin; 2. I kind of hope she does come and blow you off the stage!!!  GROW UP!!!  WHY ARE WE DISCUSSING THIS!!!?

Opera should be about music, about stories, about drama, about VOICES.  If we wanted to hear an opera without voices we’d go to the symphony.  We go to the opera to hear VOICES!  The show of skin and the display of sex on stage nowadays does nothing except to detract the audience from what they’re really there to see.  I wonder how people would react to Maria Callas today?  Do you think she’d agree to pose in that picture that Ms. De Niese is in?  I think not!  In recent days, I had the pleasure of being in the company of one of opera’s most important and highly respected impresarios, and one of the most brilliant men about singing.  I was wide eyed like a little girl as he recounted how he and his group of aficionadi used to stand outside at the Met smoking and then would run up the stairs to hear Renata Tebaldi or Franco Corelli sing their scene, and when they were done, they’d travel back downstairs to discuss the event and smoke some more (Needless to say, this group would’ve been the pride and joy of someone like Arrigo Boito who felt that smoking was a matter of intelligencia!).  I thought about what he said a lot.  I thought about how that could happen in this day and age. Was there the possibility of a singer who would cause the aficionadi to run into the theatre and only when they sang….perhaps now they’d be running into see Anna Netrebko in her bathing suit on her terrace in the middle of a snowstorm (not kidding…true story…check the internet and no I will not post).

Some food for thought on this brisk Sunday morning.  Grab a cup of coffee and maybe put on an old recording of Price or Nilsson, or Schwarzkopf…even Flagstadt…if you’re lucky Tebaldi or Muzio….and go listen to a voice…naked in its own glory and true to the art of opera.

Happy Sunday everyone!

TLV

 

Odds and Ends…or more like Oddities!

What's new?

2014 has begun afresh with new and exciting announcements about upcoming opera seasons, live broadcasts, unanticipated debuts, masterclasses, and birthdays (Happy Birthday Marilyn Horne!) In only the 3 short weeks, so much has gone on and I’ve sort of sat back and watched things unfold in a kind of voyeur type fashion (although I’m not talking about spying on intimate encounters).  Even if one is working in the operatic field every day, it’s sometimes more telling to stand back and observe what is going on around you so that you can fully understand it.

Adriana Chuchman

From the Met’s celebratory and opulent Die Fledermaus  making its première on New Years Eve, the season has continued with the great Falstaff,  L’Elisir D’Amore, and now La Bohème, three Italian masterpieces to be sure.  There have been several debuts, and cancellations such as Ms. Netrebko’s cancellation last week (due to illness) and the surprise debut of Canadian soprano Andriana Chuchman.  Ms. Chuchman’s debut was well received, and she represented her country well.  Of many singers I’ve heard as of late, I felt that Ms. Chuchman had a lovely tone and good control over her instrument.  At times it seemed a bit light for possible heavier roles, like Mimi, but for Adina, she seemed well-suited.  For those who had gone to hear the lush voluptuousness of Ms. Netrebko, they wouldn’t be receiving the same type of Adina for sure, but one that was her own valid representation.

anna_netrebko sexy

Instead, last week on Wednesday night, Ms. Netrebko showed off her more intimate self at New York’s Le Poisson Rouge, where she sang a number of Russian songs and brought several colleagues to perform with her.  The more intimate setting with just piano brought an operatic voice into the mainstream and hopefully won over some of the non-opera going public to get their butts in the seats at the opera house.  I think this idea of having singers sing in more colloquial atmospheres is intimate enough that the audience member gets to feel them up close and personal, just enough to urge them to purchase a ticket to the opera (at least I hope this is the case and that we aren’t forcing voices meant for the stage into night clubs just because). Then they can really hear the grandeur of the voice in the venue for which it was meant to be presented.

Le poisson rouge

NYC’s Le Poisson Rouge

Click here to read Zachary Woolfe’s Review of Netrebko’s performance at Le Poisson Rouge

calleja:kovalevska

Calleja/Kovalevska

The Bohème from earlier in the week was decent but over the radio it is never easy to tell what a voice sounds like in the theatre and the long and short of it is that I was a bit disappointed in the musical presentation.  I’m not sure what’s going on but Verismo and the Puccinian Palate is being presented in a very stilted manner these days.  It’s Puccini, people!!! It’s about lust, passion, love (the kind that hurts), and suffering…for Puccini above all, suffering. This Bohème seemed sanitized to me. Unfortunately, I really didn’t feel the explosive passion of this couple as they meet and their entire world explodes with longing and desire. Sure, the idea is to sing through the lines and to connect phrases but with portamento that is “inherent in Italian speech.” When the normal pattern of speech and language is disturbed to keep the lines very straight, like reading a Bach prelude and fugue, this is NOT Puccinian style.  The performance had very little give and take between the singers and conductor. The Butterfly on Tuesday was a bit freer, to be sure, but not enough to promote true Puccinian cantilena.  Don’t know what that is, Puccini-ites? Read Mosco Carner on Puccini.  Povera faccia melody did not exist in these to productions and it’s a shame. The Met has the tools, the singers, and the conductors to present this style as it should and used to be presented, but like vocal technique has changed (for some) so has the transmission of Puccinian style, and true Verismo style. I hate to pick on one issue, but it is an important one and up and coming singers ought to understand what that is and they’re not going to learn it by listening to today’s Met broadcasts (sorry).  Maybe opera is becoming more modern but Maestro Puccini isn’t!

Puccini caricature

Mosco Carner

Puccinian Authority, Mosco Carner


“Si Canta Come Si Parla”, is the first rule of Italian singing but there is not much “talking” going on this year…very little in fact, and I don’t just mean at the Met.  The Met tries its best to promote the art form in whatever way it can get people in the seats, but I think this very small little rule that produces such a huge result is important and useful.  Operas were the only type of dramatic/musical entertainment when the genre was first developed and into the early 1900s.  Musical theatre was not yet created, and there certainly were no Cineplex Odeon VIP theatres to go watch films in while being served beer and chips in your seat.  The teatro dell’opera was where you went to socialize, to hear singers (who were equated to the level of movie stars and sports stars today) and you heard (guess what?) A STORY!!!  Today, the story gets lost because teachers are too focused on sound and that, my friends, is what we’re getting…sound and not words, not vowels, lots of trilling and fluttering that sounds pretty, but we lose the actual language.  If I’m Italian and I go see an opera and I can’t understand the opera and it’s in Italian…what does it mean?

Mafalda Favero  Tito Schipa

                                                Tito Schipa

Awhile back I was helping my mom and dad move and I had my I-Pod fixated in my ear. I was at the time studying Suzel in L’Amico Fritz and Mimì and I came across the wonderful Italian singer, Mafalda Favero.  Many don’t know who she is but I want you to go and youtube this voice.  I had no score in front of me and I understood her words perfectly.  Her vowels were central, the line was beautiful, the tone was beautiful and she and Tito Schipa expressed the most beautiful Cherry Duet I’ve ever heard.  I began listening to everything she sang, from Suzel to Desdemona to Margherita in Mefistofele and it was all clear as a bell and with line enough that Puccini would’ve been thrilled.  Something that is a bit lost today is that old recordings promote this type of singing but the quality isn’t as great. What you hear is mostly squillo because the recording tools were not capable of fully capturing the tone of the singer and so the majority of what we hear is the word but the voice’s cut, which is why so many singers don’t listen to the older recordings.  Well, let me tell you, they are a treasure trove.  For example, a few singer colleagues of mine subscribe to Met on Demand (a very useful tool) but they are finding only two recordings of “Rigoletto” for example, and one of them is the most recent production.  The Met has one of the largest archives in the world and yet we are offering only two examples of Rigoletto when hundreds were performed and recorded earlier.  A case in point.

Rosa Ponselle

So, what is the point of all of this? Can the tide be changed and can we start a revolution in singing that promotes “la parola?” I’m not sure, but this singer is certainly taking the voices of the past more into consideration than anything else.  Listen to a Bohème with Tebaldi and Di Stefano, or with Albanese and Pierce and listen to the difference, crappy recording quality or not.  Last night I listened to Rosa Ponselle sing Traviata and I was in my glory.  Sure the quality is horrible, but man is it rewarding to hear the language of  the Patria sung clear as a bell and with expression enough to make a grown man weep.  Oh how I long for those days, even if they were before my time…it doesn’t mean I can’t still belong to them, and so can you.  Singer friends, take note.

Happy Sunday everyone!

Stay tuned for upcoming blog entries from The Last Verista coming to you from Italy from Feb 1-15.  

 

What’s up at the Met this Week? Verdi and some more of “The Bat”

Falstaff

Ambrogio Maestri as Verdi’s Buffone Tragico, “Falstaff”

OPERCHAT LIVE: Met Season Opener 2013, Eugene Onegin

Click below to join the chat roll

OPERACHAT LIVE: Met Season Opener 2013, Eugene Onegin – Join Now! (LIVE Try Relay: the free SMS and picture text app for iPhone.)

Click here to LISTEN LIVE!

Met Chandaliers

Operachat begins tomorrow night at 6:30pm

Onegin

Aficionados, singers, and opera lovers, join me tomorrow night for the live broadcast of the Met’s season opener, Eugene Onegin.  An opera chat link will be available tomorrow and the chat will begin at 6:30pm.  TLV will join a little after 7pm. Come share your opinions, discuss singing, and hear an opening night, which is always an historic event, with other opera lovers.  See you there!

Metropolitan Opera

20130921-113048.jpg

Listen to the Metropolitan Opera Season Premiere: Eugene Onegin on Monday Night!!!

This week on Met Opera Radio (accessible via Sirius/XM Radio or on the Met Opera website), you can hear Anna Netrebko in the season’s premiere of Eugene Onegin this Monday night at 6:30pm. 

 

Click here to Listen Live to the Met Broadcast

Anna Netrebko

Monday, September 23, 2013

page1image976

Puccini: Madama Butterfly

12/17/1977-Patanè; Scotto, Aragall, Love, Edwards

Mozart: Die Zauberflöte
3/4/1967-Krips; Raskin, Shirley, Peters, Macurdy, Uppman

Verdi: Luisa Miller
12/11/1971-Levine; Maliponte, Alexander, MacNeil, Giaiotti, Plishka, Dunn

Rossini: La Cenerentola
3/11/00-Campanella; Larmore, Gimenez, Corbelli, Alaimo, Relyea

Tchaikovsky: Eugene Onegin (OPENING NIGHT GALA/SEASON PREMIERE – LIVE FROM THE MET) Gergiev; Kwiecien, Netrebko, Beczala, Volkova, Tanovitski

Verdi: La Forza del Destino
3/20/1954-Stiedry; Milanov, Penno, Warren, Hines, Madeira, Pechner

 

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

page1image8752

Massenet: Werther
4/16/1988-Fournet; Kraus, von Stade,Stilwell, Upshaw

Bellini: La Sonnambula
12/21/1968-Bonynge; Sutherland, Alexander, Giaiotti, Boky

Verdi: Il Trovatore
3/16/1957-Rudolf; Baum, Stella, Merrill, Madeira, Moscona

Wagner: Die Walküre
12/6/1941-Leinsdorf; Traubel, Melchior, Varnay, Schorr, Thorborg

Mozart: Così fan tutte (SEASON PREMIERE – LIVE FROM THE MET)
Levine; Phillips, Polenzani, Leonard, Pogossov, de Niese, Muraro

12:00 AM ET Berg: Wozzeck
12/31/2005-Levine; Held, Dalayman, Clark, Forbis, Fink

 

Wednesday, September 25, 2013

page2image1744

Wagner: Parsifal

4/12/2003-Gergiev; Domingo, Urmana, Struckmann, Pape, Putilin, Halfvarson

Strauss: Salome
2/17/1962-Rosenstock; Lewis, Vinay, Thebom, Cassel,Olvis

Offenbach: Les Contes d’Hoffmann
2/7/1998-Young; Leech, Dessay, Racette, Larmore, Morris, Mentzer

Gounod: Faust
2/26/1972-Rich; Domingo, Zylis-Gara, Sereni, Tozzi

Mozart: La Clemenza di Tito
5/7/2005-Levine; Lopardo, Diener, von Otter, Murphy, Connolly

 

Thursday, September 26, 2013

Puccini: Madama Butterfly
12/17/1977-Patanè; Scotto, Aragall, Love, Edwards

page2image9024

Verdi: Luisa Miller
12/11/1971-Levine; Maliponte, Alexander, MacNeil, Giaiotti, Plishka, Dunn

Wagner: Die Walküre
12/6/1941-Leinsdorf; Traubel, Melchior, Varnay, Schorr, Thorborg

Verdi: La Forza del Destino
3/20/1954-Stiedry; Milanov, Penno, Warren, Hines, Madeira, Pechner

Mozart: Die Zauberflöte
3/4/1967-Krips; Raskin, Shirley, Peters, Macurdy, Uppman

6:00 PM ET 9:00 PM ET

Verdi: Il Trovatore
3/16/1957-Rudolf; Baum, Stella, Merrill, Madeira, Moscona

Rossini: La Cenerentola
3/11/00-Campanella; Larmore, Gimenez, Corbelli, Alaimo, Relyea

 

 

Friday, September 27, 2013

Berg: Wozzeck

12/31/2005-Levine; Held, Dalayman, Clark, Forbis, Fink

Mozart: La Clemenza di Tito
5/7/2005-Levine; Lopardo, Diener, von Otter, Murphy, Connolly

Massenet: Werther
4/16/1988-Fournet; Kraus, von Stade,Stilwell, Upshaw

Bellini: La Sonnambula
12/21/1968-Bonynge; Sutherland, Alexander, Giaiotti, Boky

Puccini: Madama Butterfly
12/17/1977-Patanè; Scotto, Aragall, Love, Edwards

Strauss: Salome
2/17/1962-Rosenstock; Lewis, Vinay, Thebom, Cassel,Olvis

Offenbach: Les Contes d’Hoffmann
2/7/1998-Young; Leech, Dessay, Racette, Larmore, Morris, Mentzer

 

Saturday, Sunday 28, 2013

Gounod: Faust
2/26/1972-Rich; Domingo, Zylis-Gara, Sereni, Tozzi

page3image11856

Verdi: La Forza del Destino
3/20/1954-Stiedry; Milanov, Penno, Warren, Hines, Madeira, Pechner

Rossini: La Cenerentola
3/11/00-Campanella; Larmore, Gimenez, Corbelli, Alaimo, Relyea

Shostakovich: The Nose (SEASON PREMIERE – LIVE FROM THE MET)
Gergiev; Szot, Popov, Ognovenko

Verdi: Luisa Miller
12/11/1971-Levine; Maliponte, Alexander, MacNeil, Giaiotti, Plishka, Dunn

Mozart: Die Zauberflöte
3/4/1967-Krips; Raskin, Shirley, Peters, Macurdy, Uppman

Wagner: Die Walküre
12/6/1941-Leinsdorf; Traubel, Melchior, Varnay, Schorr, Thorborg

 

Sunday, September 29, 2013

page4image5752

Verdi: Il Trovatore

3/16/1957-Rudolf; Baum, Stella, Merrill, Madeira, Moscona

Gounod: Faust
2/26/1972-Rich; Domingo, Zylis-Gara, Sereni, Tozzi

Wagner: Parsifal
4/12/2003-Gergiev; Domingo, Urmana, Struckmann, Pape, Putilin, Halfvarson

Massenet: Werther
4/16/1988-Fournet; Kraus, von Stade,Stilwell, Upshaw

The Met on Record: Verdi: La Traviata (1991) Levine; Studer, Pavarotti, Pons

Bellini: La Sonnambula
12/21/1968-Bonynge; Sutherland, Alexander, Giaiotti, Boky

The Last Verista’s “Pick of the Week” for Jan 29-Feb 5, 2012 on Met Opera Radio (Sirius/XM): Millo/Pavarotti “Il Trovatore”

Monday, January 30, 2012

6:00am: Verdi: Il Trovatore
1/21/1989-Levine; Pavarotti, Millo, Milnes, Cossotto, Plishka

9:00am: R. Strauss: Salome
3/18/1972-Böhm; Rysanek, Stolze, Dalis, Stewart, MacWherter

12:00pm: Britten: Billy Budd
4/4/1992-Mackerras; Hampson, Clark, Morris, Held, Courtney

3:00pm: Mozart: Le Nozze di Figaro
1/28/1961-Leinsdorf; Siepi, Peters, Borg, Amara, Miller, Flagello

6:00pm: Gounod: Roméo et Juliette
1/25/1986-Cambreling; Malfitano, Shicoff, Plishka, Harris, Schexnayder

9:00pm: Puccini: La Bohème
3/19/1977-Levine; Scotto, Pavarotti, Niska, Wixell, Monk, Plishka

12:00am: Janácek: Jenufa
12/26/1992-Conlon; Benacková, Heppner, Rysanek, Trussel, Christin, Guyer, Wells, Skok, Kelly, JCourtney, Castle, Uecker, Di Franco

Tuesday, January 31, 2012

page1image10032

6:00am: Offenbach: Les Contes d’Hoffmann
3/27/1982-Chailly; Domingo, Welting, Troyanos, Eda-Pierre, Morris, Howells, Sénéchal

9:00am: Verdi: Nabucco
4/5/2003-Levine; Ataneli, Neves, Casanova, White, Ramey, Waite, Kowaljow, Valdes

12:00pm: Donizetti: La Favorita
3/11/1978-López-Cobos; Verrett, Pavarotti, Milnes, Giaiotti

3:00pm: Mozart: Idomeneo
12/21/1991-Levine; Heppner, Upshaw, Mentzer, Vaness, Kazaras

6:00 PM ET Wagner: Götterdämmerung (LIVE FROM THE MET) Luisi; Voigt, Gould, König, Meier, Harmer, Paterson,Owens

12:00 AM ET Verdi: Messa da Requiem
2/20/1982-Levine; Price, Quivar, Domingo, Cheek

Wednesday, February 1, 2012

page2image3088

6:00am: Gounod: Faust
3/17/2007-Benini; Vargas, Swenson, Abdrazakov, Yun

9:00am: Verdi: Un Ballo in Maschera
2/28/1959-Schippers; Stella, Peerce, Merrill, Madeira, Hurley

12:00pm: Wagner: Lohengrin
3/21/1998-Levine; Heppner, Voigt, Polaski, Ketelsen, Halfvarson

6:00pm: Britten: Billy Budd
4/4/1992-Mackerras; Hampson, Clark, Morris, Held, Courtney

9:00pm: Verdi: Il Trovatore
1/21/1989-Levine; Pavarotti, Millo, Milnes, Cossotto, Plishka

12:00pm: R. Strauss: Salome
3/18/1972-Böhm; Rysanek, Stolze, Dalis, Stewart, MacWherter

Thursday, February 2, 2012

6:00am: Janácek: Jenufa
12/26/1992-Conlon; Benacková, Heppner, Rysanek, Trussel, Christin, Guyer, Wells, Skok, Kelly, JCourtney, Castle, Uecker, Di Franco

9:00am: Mozart: Le Nozze di Figaro
1/28/1961-Leinsdorf; Siepi, Peters, Borg, Amara, Miller, Flagello

12:00pm: Gounod: Roméo et Juliette
1/25/1986-Cambreling; Malfitano, Shicoff, Plishka, Harris, Schexnayder

3:00pm: Puccini: La Bohème                                                                                                                                                                                                                       3/19/1977-Levine; Scotto, Pavarotti, Niska, Wixell, Monk, Plishka

6:00pm: Verdi: Ernani (SEASON PREMIERE – LIVE FROM THE MET) Armiliato; De Biasio, Meade, Furlanetto, Hvorostovsky

12:00am: Offenbach: Les Contes d’Hoffmann
3/27/1982-Chailly; Domingo, Welting, Troyanos, Eda-Pierre, Morris, Howells, Sénéchal

Friday, February 3, 2012

page3image4368

6:00am: Wagner: Lohengrin
3/21/1998-Levine; Heppner, Voigt, Polaski, Ketelsen, Halfvarson

12:00pm: Gounod: Faust
3/17/2007-Benini; Vargas, Swenson, Abdrazakov, Yun

3:00pm: Donizetti: La Favorita
3/11/1978-López-Cobos; Verrett, Pavarotti, Milnes, Giaiotti

6:00pm: Verdi: Nabucco
4/5/2003-Levine; Ataneli, Neves, Casanova, White, Ramey, Waite, Kowaljow, Valdes

9:00pm: Mozart: Idomeneo
12/21/1991-Levine; Heppner, Upshaw, Mentzer, Vaness, Kazaras

12:00pm: Verdi: Un Ballo in Maschera
2/28/1959-Schippers; Stella, Peerce, Merrill, Madeira, Hurley

Saturday, February 4, 2012

page3image11640

6:00am: Britten: Billy Budd
4/4/1992-Mackerras; Hampson, Clark, Morris, Held, Courtney

9:00am: Puccini: La Bohème
3/19/1977-Levine; Scotto, Pavarotti, Niska, Wixell, Monk, Plishka

12:00pm: Donizetti: Anna Bolena (LIVE FROM THE MET) Armiliato; Netrebko, Gubanova, Abdrazakov, Costello, Mumford

6:00pm: Verdi: Messa da Requiem
2/20/1982-Levine; Price, Quivar, Domingo, Cheek

9:00pm: Mozart: Le Nozze di Figaro
1/28/1961-Leinsdorf; Siepi, Peters, Borg, Amara, Miller, Flagello

12:00am: Gounod: Roméo et Juliette
1/25/1986-Cambreling; Malfitano, Shicoff, Plishka, Harris, Schexnayder

Sunday, February 5, 2012

page4image5224

6:00am: Donizetti: La Favorita
3/11/1978-López-Cobos; Verrett, Pavarotti, Milnes, Giaiotti

9:00am: Verdi: Il Trovatore
1/21/1989-Levine; Pavarotti, Millo, Milnes, Cossotto, Plishka

12:00pm: Janácek: Jenufa
12/26/1992-Conlon; Benacková, Heppner, Rysanek, Trussel, Christin, Guyer, Wells, Skok, Kelly, JCourtney, Castle, Uecker, Di Franco

3:00pm: R. Strauss: Salome
3/18/1972-Böhm; Rysanek, Stolze, Dalis, Stewart, MacWherter

6:00pm: Offenbach: Les Contes d’Hoffmann
3/27/1982-Chailly; Domingo, Welting, Troyanos, Eda-Pierre, Morris, Howells, Sénéchal

This Month at The Met
Jay Hunter Morris, Peter Gelb, Fabio Luisi, Diana Damrau, Stephanie Blythe, Quiz encore hosted by Matthew Polenzani, Angela Meade

9:00pm: Verdi: Nabucco
4/5/2003-Levine; Ataneli, Neves, Casanova, White, Ramey, Waite, Kowaljow, Valdes

Reviews and Commentary from Last Night’s Met Opener: Anna Bolena

Here is Anthony Tommassini’s article in today’s New York Times

A Queen’s Delusion and Defiance Opens the Met

By 
Published: September 27, 2011

Since arriving at the Metropolitan Opera as general manager in 2006, Peter Gelb has been angling to make the soprano Anna Netrebko a house prima donna in the old-world sense: a first among equals. On Monday night Mr. Gelb must have felt that the plan was working.

Ms. Netrebko sang the punishing title role of Donizetti’s “Anna Bolena” to open the Met’s season, the company’s first production of this breakthrough Donizetti work from 1830. The extended last scene was the high point of Ms. Netrebko’s performance as the distraught British queen (based on the historic Anne Boleyn, the second wife of Henry VIII). Having been falsely condemned for betraying her husband, Anna drifts in and out of sanity.

Ms. Netrebko sang an elegantly sad aria with lustrous warmth, aching vulnerability and floating high notes. When the audience broke into prolonged applause and bravos, Ms. Netrebko seemed to break character and smiled a couple of times, though her look could have been taken as appropriate to the dramatic moment, since the delusional Anna is lost in reverie about happy days with her former lover.

Then at the end of this “Mad Scene,” when Anna, restored to horrific reality, curses the king and his new queen, Giovanna (Jane Seymour), and stalks off to her execution, Ms. Netrebko dispatched Donizetti’s cabaletta, all brilliant coloratura runs and vehement phrases, with a defiance that brought down the house.

Yet Ms. Netrebko’s Anna and the overall performance of “Anna Bolena” were not what they could have been. The production, by the director David McVicar, is uninventive and safe. The sets, by Robert Jones (in his Met debut), are handsome and efficient but tamely traditional, using a matrix of rotating white brick walls and sliding wood panels to evoke the interiors and environs of Henry’s palaces. In Act I, when the king’s hunting party gathers, complete with two impressively large dogs, a bit of abstraction is introduced into the look of the production through some sculptural gray trees. Jenny Tiramani’s costumes are colorful, detailed and true to the period. Too true. This Henry could have come from the set of almost any of the innumerable films and television shows that have been made about the Tudors.

But the bigger problem was Marco Armiliato’s routine conducting. Mr. Armiliato has been valuable to the Met’s Italian repertory wing since his 1998 house debut. In “Anna Bolena” he conveyed an understanding of bel canto style, in which arching lines must be given room to spin and cast their spell and accompaniment patterns have to be flexible.

The singers seemed to feel supported by Mr. Armiliato, who was always there when they took expressive liberties. That was the problem. This performance needed a conductor to instill some intensity into the music, to keep the cast more on edge, especially in the early scenes. Much of the action occurs in highly charged bursts of dramatic recitative. But too often here the orchestra chords that buttress the vocal lines were listless. And the orchestra’s playing lacked character.

Previously, Ms. Netrebko had sung the role of Anna only at the Vienna State Opera this spring. She started tentatively on Monday, perhaps settling in for the long, hard night of singing that awaited her. She looked regal and splendid. And in a nice directorial touch, Anna first appeared with a little red-haired girl, clearly her daughter, the future Queen Elizabeth.

At 40, Ms. Netrebko may be in her vocal prime. Her sound is meltingly rich yet focused. Sustained tones have body and depth. Her contained vibrato exposed every slight slip from the center of a pitch, especially in midrange, but I’m not complaining. This remains a major voice, with resplendent colorings and built-in expressivity.

Bel canto purists have long debated whether Ms. Netrebko is a natural to the style, especially in her execution of coloratura passagework. She may not have the nimble precision exemplified by Beverly Sills (who was criticized in some circles for that very accuracy). Ms. Netrebko’s approach is to sing coloratura as an expressive elaboration of the vocal line, as she did affectingly as Anna. And she exudes vocal charisma.

Still, at moments throughout the evening her singing seemed cautious. She was at her best when sparring with other singers, especially the mezzo-soprano Ekaterina Gubanova, who was Giovanna (the queen’s lady-in-waiting Jane Seymour, though it’s best to stick to the Italian names, since “Anna Bolena,” with a libretto by Felice Romani, plays very loose with history). Ms. Gubanova has an ample, dark voice with a slightly hard-edged quality that takes some adjusting to. She sang Giovanna with incisive delivery, folding embellishments and runs into impassioned vocal lines.

Her character was a bundle of nerves in Donizetti’s inspired Act II scene in which Giovanna finally confesses to the queen that she has been the king’s mistress and will become his new wife. Again the orchestra under Mr. Armiliato seemed to hold back, rather than empower, the intensity these two artists were trying to summon on stage.

The bass Ildar Abdrazakov brought his earthy, muscular voice to the role of Enrico (Henry VIII). Though his passagework was muffled by his gravelly tones at times, he was an imposing presence, and he did not overplay the king’s brutishness. The tenor Stephen Costello won a hearty ovation for his Riccardo (Lord Richard Percy, Anna’s former lover). This was a big assignment for the gifted and game young tenor. Mr. Costello captured the character’s consuming adoration for Anna through his impetuous and anguished singing.

The role includes a touchstone tenor aria, “Vivi tu,” in which the condemned Riccardo implores his friend Lord Rocheford (Anna’s brother, here the solid bass-baritone Keith Miller) to evade the king’s wrath and go on living. Mr. Costello mostly navigated the music’s demanding passagework and exposed high notes. To hear this rising artist stretching himself was part of the excitement.

The mezzo-soprano Tamara Mumford took on the trouser role of Mark Smeaton, a court musician with a fatal crush on Anna. Her singing was sometimes shaky but always honest and ardent. The able tenor Eduardo Valdes as the court official Hervey rounded out the cast. Every role is significant in an opera so rich with ensembles, including a climactic Act I sextet almost as memorable as the enduring sextet from Donizetti’s “Lucia di Lammermoor,” and more contrapuntally intricate.

Mr. Gelb has said that ideally the Met should make an artistic statement by presenting an ambitious new production every opening night. Two years ago he took a chance on Luc Bondy’s ill-conceived staging of Puccini’s “Tosca.” Last season came the premiere of Robert Lepage’s production of Wagner’s “Rheingold,” which is still being argued over, as audiences await the last two installments of the complete “Ring” cycle this season.

“Anna Bolena” represented a different sort of risk. To make a case for this great, overlooked opera a company must have a stellar soprano in the title role. Ms. Netrebko is that artist. If only she and her colleagues on stage had received more help from Mr. McVicar and Mr. Armiliato.

The gala evening performance was relayed to Times Square and to Lincoln Center Plaza, where there was seating for some 3,000 people who had scooped up free tickets earlier. After the curtain calls on stage, the “Anna Bolena” cast appeared on the Met’s outdoor balcony to the cheers of the crowd. This is becoming a welcome tradition under Mr. Gelb.

“Anna Bolena” runs through Oct. 28, with additional performances in February, at the Metropolitan Opera House, Lincoln Center; (212) 362-6000, metopera.org.

As ever, in the history of music, the “critics” are the ones who write and in many cases enhanced or destroyed a singer/musician’s career.  This has been the constant case from the inception of musical criticism with Schumann and Berlioz in the mid-nineteenth century.  This is not to say that Tommassini has any power to ruin Netrebko’s career, but he does have a huge audience by being the critic of one of the most powerful and well-read newspapers in the world.  So, NOW, now he chooses to talk about Bel Canto, about Italian singing when the last year brought absolutely horrifying presentations of Puccini and Verdi?  I absolutely agree with Mr. Tommassini, that Netrebko’s voice is one of the most beautiful voices cast at the Met this year, but let’s not discuss pitch or wavering from it, shall we, or we ought to have a new society for it.  Forgive me but Netrebko is the LEAST off pitch and her tone is unparalleled by her colleagues singing at the Met.  It seems that nothing was said about the extravagant flatness, sharpness, and completely disgusting Italian diction that was presented last season, was it?  In all, her singing is always expressive and she carries some of the mystique that singers of old carried with them, that implausible something that elevates them to the level of artists.  I agree that Armiliato was probably not the best choice to conduct Bolena and it is certainly too bad that Maestro Levine was not able to conduct this opening.  However, Bel Canto as the opening opera is not a choice made just to appease the rowdy public after that disastrous Tosca premiere last year (truly abominable), as Tommassini writes.  Bel Canto is the heart’s blood of the operatic machine that has withstood centuries.  More Bel Canto should be performed so that young singers will approach it without fear and with a more familiar ear.  I applaud the Met for presenting this difficult opera and to those who stretched their limits in trying to do the only thing they could in an age when those who truly understand Bel Canto are few and far between.

More Reviews:

Review by Mike Silverman of the Associated Press

“A Philadelphia Son Storms The Met” (Wall Street Journal)

 

The Last Verista’s Pick of the Week on MET OPERA RADIO: OPENING NIGHT AT THE MET! Donizetti’s “Anna Bolena” starring Anna Netrebko

Don’t miss opening night, tomorrow night!!! Catch it all on Sirius/XM Radio MET OPERA RADIO!! 

Don’t have Sirius/XM? Click here to listen live from the Met’s Live Stream for FREE!

Met’s Live Stream of Opening Night


Monday, September 26, 2011
6am: Wagner: Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg  3/7/1959-Böhm; Edelmann, Nordmo-Lövberg, Feiersinger, Franke, Dönch, Resnik

12pm: Verdi: Otello
4/2/1994-Gergiev; Domingo, Vaness, Leiferkus, Bunnell, Croft

3pm: Janácek: Jenufa
12/21/1974-Nelson; Kubiak, Vickers, Varnay, Lewis, Kraft, Norden, Reardon, Di Franco, Love, Gill, Ordassy, Smith

6pm: Donizetti: Anna Bolena (LIVE FROM THE MET – SEASON PREMIERE)
Armiliato; Netrebko, Gubanova, Mumford, Costello, Abdrazakov

12am: Bellini: Il Pirata
2/8/2003-Campanella; Fleming, Giordani, Croft

Tuesday, September 27, 2011
6am: Verdi: Il Trovatore: 2/18/1967-Molinari-Pradelli; Tucker, Arroyo, Merrill, Cvejic, Michalski

9am: Massenet: Werther
1/23/1999-Runnicles; Hampson, Graham, Robertson, Evans

12pm: Wagner: Tannhäuser
1/21/1978-Levine; McCracken, Kubiak, Weikl, Bumbry, Macurdy

3pm: Corigliano: The Ghosts of Versailles
1/4/1992-Levine; Stratas, Hagegård, Quilico, Horne, Clark, Fleming

7:30pm: Verdi: Nabucco (LIVE FROM THE MET – SEASON PREMIERE)
Carignani; Guleghina, Tatum, Lee, Lučić, Colombara

12am: Donizetti: Lucia di Lammermoor
12/31/1966-Bonynge; Sutherland, Tucker, Colzani, Ghiuselev

Wednesday, September 28, 2011

6am: Verdi: I Vespri Siciliani
12/11/2004-Chaslin; Radvanovsky, Casanova, Nucci, Ramey

9am: Mozart: Don Giovanni
2/2/1991-Levine; Hampson, Studer, Schuman, Upshaw, Blochwitz, Plishka, Cokorinos

12pm: R. Strauss: Ariadne auf Naxos
1/5/1985-Davis; Norman, Cochran, Rolandi, Ewing, Weller, Duesing

3pm: Puccini: Madama Butterfly
9/25/2006-Levine; Gallardo-Domâs, Giordani, Zifchak, Croft, Fedderly, Courtney, Won, Kulczak, Miller

6pm: Verdi: Otello
4/2/1994-Gergiev; Domingo, Vaness, Leiferkus, Bunnell, Croft

9pm: Wagner: Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg
3/7/1959-Böhm; Edelmann, Nordmo-Lövberg, Feiersinger, Franke, Dönch, Resnik

Thursday, September 29, 2011

6am: Janácek: Jenufa
12/21/1974-Nelson; Kubiak, Vickers, Varnay, Lewis, Kraft, Norden, Reardon, Di Franco, Love, Gill, Ordassy, Smith

9am: Bellini: Il Pirata
2/8/2003-Campanella; Fleming, Giordani, Croft

12pm: Verdi: Il Trovatore
2/18/1967-Molinari-Pradelli; Tucker, Arroyo, Merrill, Cvejic, Michalski

3pm: Massenet: Werther
1/23/1999-Runnicles; Hampson, Graham, Robertson, Evans

6pm: Donizetti: Lucia di Lammermoor
12/31/1966-Bonynge; Sutherland, Tucker, Colzani, Ghiuselev

9pm: : Wagner: Tannhäuser  1/21/1978-Levine; McCracken, Kubiak, Weikl, Bumbry, Macurdy

12:00 AM ET Corigliano: The Ghosts of Versailles
1/4/1992-Levine; Stratas, Hagegård, Quilico, Horne, Clark, Fleming

Friday, September 30, 2011

6am: Verdi: Otello
4/2/1994-Gergiev; Domingo, Vaness, Leiferkus, Bunnell, Croft

9am: Puccini: Madama Butterfly
9/25/2006-Levine; Gallardo-Domâs, Giordani, Zifchak, Croft, Fedderly, Courtney, Won, Kulczak, Miller

12pm: Wagner: Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg
3/7/1959-Böhm; Edelmann, Nordmo-Lövberg, Feiersinger, Franke, Dönch, Resnik

6pm: Verdi: I Vespri Siciliani
12/11/2004-Chaslin; Radvanovsky, Casanova, Nucci, Ramey

9pm: Mozart: Don Giovanni
2/2/1991-Levine; Hampson, Studer, Schuman, Upshaw, Blochwitz, Plishka, Cokorinos

12am: R. Strauss: Ariadne auf Naxos
1/5/1985-Davis; Norman, Cochran, Rolandi, Ewing, Weller, Duesing

Saturday, October 1, 2011

6am: Wagner: Tannhäuser
1/21/1978-Levine; McCracken, Kubiak, Weikl, Bumbry, Macurdy

9am: Corigliano: The Ghosts of Versailles
1/4/1992-Levine; Stratas, Hagegård, Quilico, Horne, Clark, Fleming

1pm: Rossini: Il Barbiere di Siviglia (LIVE FROM THE MET –SEASON PREMIERE) Benini; Leonard, Camarena, Mattei, Muraro, Burchuladze 

6pm; Bellini: Il Pirata:  2/8/2003-Campanella; Fleming, Giordani, Croft

9pm: Verdi: Il Trovatore
2/18/1967-Molinari-Pradelli; Tucker, Arroyo, Merrill, Cvejic, Michalski

12am: Janácek: Jenufa
12/21/1974-Nelson; Kubiak, Vickers, Varnay, Lewis, Kraft, Norden, Reardon, Di Franco, Love, Gill, Ordassy, Smith

Sunday, October 2, 2011

6am: R. Strauss: Ariadne auf Naxos
1/5/1985-Davis; Norman, Cochran, Rolandi, Ewing, Weller, Duesing

9am: Donizetti: Lucia di Lammermoor
12/31/1966-Bonynge; Sutherland, Tucker, Colzani, Ghiuselev

12pm: Verdi: I Vespri Siciliani
12/11/2004-Chaslin; Radvanovsky, Casanova, Nucci, Ramey

3pm: Mozart: Don Giovanni
2/2/1991-Levine; Hampson, Studer, Schuman, Upshaw, Blochwitz, Plishka, Cokorinos

6pm: Puccini: Madama Butterfly
9/25/2006-Levine; Gallardo-Domâs, Giordani, Zifchak, Croft, Fedderly, Courtney, Won, Kulczak, Miller

9pm: The Met on Record: Verdi: I Lombardi (1996) Levine; Anderson, Leech, Pavarotti, Ramey

12am: Massenet: Werther
1/23/1999-Runnicles; Hampson, Graham, Robertson, Evans